700c Tires On A Mountain Bike – Review

700c Tires On A Mountain Bike

There are no two ways about it: mountain biking is a highly competitive sport. As a result, rivals and manufacturers are always on the lookout for new methods like 700c tires on a mountain bike to boost their game and improve the performance of their motorcycles.

Whether you are a triathlete training for a triathlon or a bike enthusiast seeking to get a new mountain bike, tire size affects your experience on the road or terrain. You’d think buying tires for your bike would be simple and should notice is it easy to put air in mountain bike tires, but it’s not, cause there are many things to consider. Getting the right size tires to suit your rims is one of the most perplexing aspects of biking as like to consider the perfect tire valves, due in part to a lack of consistency in how tire sizes are presented.

Tire Size

The size of a bike’s wheels is one of the elements that determine how well it will operate. Because most motorcyclists desire to improve their riding performance, they must get the correct size wheels for their bikes. When it comes to mountain bike tires, width isn’t necessarily the most important factor to consider. The most important factor is the diameter.

700c

700C is the current standard for road, cyclotrons, and many hybrid tires. 700C tires can also be seen on some European-style cruiser motorcycles as like with the perfect tire valve.

The “700” refers to the tire’s approximate outside diameter; however, the exact outer diameter will vary significantly depending on the kind of tire and tread pattern. The BSD of 700C tires is 622mm.

The majority of high-performance road bike tires are 23 or 25 millimeters wide, however, some are as small as 18mm and as large as 28mm. The width of cyclocross and touring tires ranges from 28mm to 38mm, whereas hybrid bikes have tires ranging from 35mm to 45mm.

29er Mountain Bike

29er Bike
29er Bike

29ers, a new kind of mountain bike, have become the new standard in many mountain biking categories. These are 29-inch-wheeled mountain bikes. The number “29” refers to the diameter of the wheels used on these motorcycles. Many novices, as well as seasoned bike riders, are unsure if the 29-inch wheel size and the 700c wheel size are interchangeable. A 29-inch MTB wheel has the same diameter as a 700c road bike wheel.

As a result, even bike shop employees are unaware that 700c tires may be put on 29-inch MTBs straight away as long as the tire width is supported by the rim. The tire will not be secure and may blow out if it is too thin for the rim. A road race tire will not fit on a 29-inch MTB rim, although very narrow city tires can be installed.

700c Vs 29er

A 29-inch wheel is the same as a 700C wheel, but not the other way around. A 700C tire will fit on a 29-inch rim without any width or casing length modifications.

A 29-inch wheel is equivalent to a 700C wheel. In fact, a 29-inch tire will fit on your 700C wheel without requiring any adjustments to width or length. The only exception is if you’re utilizing a vintage rim with less than 16 spokes per side. If you are unclear if your tires will fit correctly over your rims, adjust the width and casing length appropriately.

Converting Bikes

Road Tires On a Mountain Bike
Road Tires On a Mountain Bike

This is a frequently asked question among mountain bikers. Many individuals want to ride their trail bikes at home to do errands or commute to work, yet we all know that road bikes and mountain bikes are extremely different in design.

The simple answer is yes, you can put road tires on a mountain bike, but owing to the extremely different design of a mountain bike versus a road bike, you will also need to make some additional modifications and take the bike’s design into mind to make this transfer work. If you want to know more in-depth, check out our full-length article addressing this issue.

29-inch mountain bikes already use 700c wheels. MTBs with diameters of 26 and 27.5 inches have adequate room to fit 700c rims and tires of the right size.

The change will be easier if both the bike and the new wheels are disc brake-ready.

Unfortunately, rim brakes will cause compatibility difficulties since the pads and rims will not line, necessitating the usage of special adapters. The breadth of the rear hub might also cause issues.

Problems You May Face

  1. Toe Overlap – Putting 700c wheels on a tiny MTB frame increases the risk of striking your toes with the tire during tight bends.
  2. Low Appearance – The antics necessary to make rim brakes function will result in an unappealing braking area. Some bicycle aficionados will see this as a big issue.
  3. Tire Options Are Restricted – Unless your MTB is a 29er, the number of tires that will fit is quite limited.
  4. Too Much Work – The conversion will need a significant amount of tweaking. If you work or play as a bike mechanic, you may like the experience, but newcomers may not share your passion.
  5. Costly – The costs may mount to the point that you’d be better off buying a used road or gravel bike. There goes the answer if it is cheaper to build a mountain bike.

FAQ’S

Q1: Will 700c Wheels Increase The Speed Of My Bike?

Ans: If two bikes have the same gearing, the one with the larger wheels will be quicker. Because the bike with the larger wheels has a larger circumference, it will be quicker and cover more distance.

Q2: How Do I Choose The Correct Size Tires For My Bike?

Ans: Getting the right size tires to suit your rims is one of the most perplexing aspects of biking, due in part to a lack of consistency in how tire sizes are presented.

Conclusion

Ride with confidence on bike tires designed to anticipate problems, adapt to changing circumstances, and assist you in riding at your best. 700c bike tires come in a variety of shapes and sizes, ranging from sleek road tires to bulky all-mountain tires. Don’t let your rubber get in the way of your finest ride ever, no matter where it takes you.

However, nowadays, not every mountain bike can accommodate 700c wheels. You should measure the outside diameter of your mountain bike’s standard wheel, and if the difference isn’t too large, you may attempt switching the wheels. You also get to know how to put air in a mountain bike tire.

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